As an artist I find inspiration most in humans, human activity and interaction as well as how it shapes the...

‘You be You’ is a collection of pencil portraits on paper. These portraits realise the diversity and beauty of the human form in real life instead of seeing beauty as photoshop and clever angles of in selfie. The portrait the two faceless female bodies shows the same woman sitting in two different ways each making her figure look considerably different, but both are still beautiful. Neither pose was intended to be sexy, the woman was just going about having her cigarette normally whilst allowing herself to be photographed for the drawings. I have not drawn her face as she wished to remain anonymous. Every individual drawn has consented to being drawn and as consented to having the drawings publicly displayed in this exhibition.

We often allow our standards of beauty in the world to be defined by photoshop, filters, plastic surgery and makeup. We become brainwashed into holding our selves to unrealistic standard of what is beautiful. Often in the past I have compared myself to online images of friends and celebrities without considering the reality people tend to only share the images that of the best and most desirable versions of themselves. This directly caused me to suffer with body dysmorphia contributing to eating disorders and deteriorating my mental health.

I disconnected myself from unrealistic standard of beauty by observing people in their reality in my day to day life, focusing on how their physical differences in their appearance made them unique and interesting. The things some of my friends felt insecure about I found beautiful and realised that the things I dislike about myself other may find beautiful. But above all I found beauty in confidence.

I hope these portraits of people confidently displaying themselves as they naturally are inspires confidence in within you and makes you reconsider what beauty means to you.

Samantha Hockley

Give this some love

12+

‘You be You’ is a collection of pencil portraits on paper. These portraits realise the diversity and beauty of the human form in real life instead of seeing beauty as photoshop and clever angles of in selfie. The portrait the two faceless female bodies shows the same woman sitting in two different ways each making her figure look considerably different, but both are still beautiful. Neither pose was intended to be sexy, the woman was just going about having her cigarette normally whilst allowing herself to be photographed for the drawings. I have not drawn her face as she wished to remain anonymous. Every individual drawn has consented to being drawn and as consented to having the drawings publicly displayed in this exhibition.

We often allow our standards of beauty in the world to be defined by photoshop, filters, plastic surgery and makeup. We become brainwashed into holding our selves to unrealistic standard of what is beautiful. Often in the past I have compared myself to online images of friends and celebrities without considering the reality people tend to only share the images that of the best and most desirable versions of themselves. This directly caused me to suffer with body dysmorphia contributing to eating disorders and deteriorating my mental health.

I disconnected myself from unrealistic standard of beauty by observing people in their reality in my day to day life, focusing on how their physical differences in their appearance made them unique and interesting. The things some of my friends felt insecure about I found beautiful and realised that the things I dislike about myself other may find beautiful. But above all I found beauty in confidence.

I hope these portraits of people confidently displaying themselves as they naturally are inspires confidence in within you and makes you reconsider what beauty means to you.

Samantha Hockley

Give this some love

12+
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