I am interested in the psychology behind the creative instinct and find myself most connected to art generated by free...

I have exhibited a series of nostalgic photographs, taken over the last twelve years. The project began as a visual exploration of the potential of found assemblage and unstaged object juxtapositions, and how they may be framed to generate coherent narrative and, perhaps, inspire psycho-biographical resonance. I’m interested in how people make sense of random and directive visual cues and have evolved my considerations around the formation of narrative, by keeping aware of my own process, alongside the insights that others may bring to their understanding of my work.

The exhibition is largely experimental, in that I have, used a combination of titled and untitled images; Imposing my own context on the photographs, by naming or subjectively commenting on their meaning, has given me the chance to extend my imagination and come up against the limits of my own internal framework of reference. The decision to leave the larger displayed images untitled, was made to open them up to wider interpretation and allow the viewer’s own internal and sociocultural experiences to animate and provide context to what is there. As the photographs, for the most part, depict curation of objects in flea market or boot-sale settings, I have edited and displayed the material in keeping with the theme of the haphazard or quickly staged market stall; arranging the exhibition out of instinct and convenience, in groupings of objects that inspire similar themes and ideas.

The enduring appeal of some of the ornaments featured in the photographs, interests me, as does understanding how a cross-section of a diverse population may relate to them today. In regard to the use of sensitive material and questions of taste; I believe that, although many of the items pictured are figurines from a bygone era, considered kitsch or quaint, and in some cases objectionable or offensive, they continue to be in circulation, and as such, deserve to be looked at and thought about, both in context, and with sensitivity to the present time. In addition to its potential for social, cultural, and psycho-biographical commentary, I hope that this project documenting moments in the lives of objects, will serve to highlight reflexive thinking around certain issues, and the inbuilt stories we each carry with us.

Give this some love

I have exhibited a series of nostalgic photographs, taken over the last twelve years. The project began as a visual exploration of the potential of found assemblage and unstaged object juxtapositions, and how they may be framed to generate coherent narrative and, perhaps, inspire psycho-biographical resonance. I’m interested in how people make sense of random and directive visual cues and have evolved my considerations around the formation of narrative, by keeping aware of my own process, alongside the insights that others may bring to their understanding of my work.

The exhibition is largely experimental, in that I have, used a combination of titled and untitled images; Imposing my own context on the photographs, by naming or subjectively commenting on their meaning, has given me the chance to extend my imagination and come up against the limits of my own internal framework of reference. The decision to leave the larger displayed images untitled, was made to open them up to wider interpretation and allow the viewer’s own internal and sociocultural experiences to animate and provide context to what is there. As the photographs, for the most part, depict curation of objects in flea market or boot-sale settings, I have edited and displayed the material in keeping with the theme of the haphazard or quickly staged market stall; arranging the exhibition out of instinct and convenience, in groupings of objects that inspire similar themes and ideas.

The enduring appeal of some of the ornaments featured in the photographs, interests me, as does understanding how a cross-section of a diverse population may relate to them today. In regard to the use of sensitive material and questions of taste; I believe that, although many of the items pictured are figurines from a bygone era, considered kitsch or quaint, and in some cases objectionable or offensive, they continue to be in circulation, and as such, deserve to be looked at and thought about, both in context, and with sensitivity to the present time. In addition to its potential for social, cultural, and psycho-biographical commentary, I hope that this project documenting moments in the lives of objects, will serve to highlight reflexive thinking around certain issues, and the inbuilt stories we each carry with us.

Give this some love

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