My name is Lydia Law, and I am a determined 21-year-old who has just completed studying for a BA (Hons)...

For my final major project unit, the decision was made to create and film a documentary about my disability, a rare genetic condition called Trisomy 8. The initial idea was that this documentary could be shared with potential employers (as well as family and friends etc) or any education I may undertake. This is because, many times in the past, whenever I’ve filled out an application form, for example, it usually asks about a disability which has resulted in myself or my mum or dad writing a fair bit on the form sometimes resulting in having to use another piece of paper. This wasn’t necessarily the main reason as it was also felt that this documentary would enable me to be more open about the fact that I have a disability and the challenges I faced growing up and how I’ve had to adapt. As a result, my confidence has grown a lot during the whole process.

At the beginning of the documentary, I introduced and explained a bit about my genetic condition and my early life and then gave some insight into some of my daily struggle’s past and present. I then interviewed my parents to understand their own experience and feelings throughout my life growing up and the impact of my diagnosis on them. I then interviewed Lissette Lent, an American living in Arizona whose daughter Maggie, also has Trisomy 8, although not quite the same. The interview with Lissette was incredibly insightful as I could see many similarities between myself and Maggie and also my parents and Lissette’s perspective. I then concluded the documentary by giving a brief explanation about my own perspective and feelings and a message to my future self.

Lydia Law.

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For my final major project unit, the decision was made to create and film a documentary about my disability, a rare genetic condition called Trisomy 8. The initial idea was that this documentary could be shared with potential employers (as well as family and friends etc) or any education I may undertake. This is because, many times in the past, whenever I’ve filled out an application form, for example, it usually asks about a disability which has resulted in myself or my mum or dad writing a fair bit on the form sometimes resulting in having to use another piece of paper. This wasn’t necessarily the main reason as it was also felt that this documentary would enable me to be more open about the fact that I have a disability and the challenges I faced growing up and how I’ve had to adapt. As a result, my confidence has grown a lot during the whole process.

At the beginning of the documentary, I introduced and explained a bit about my genetic condition and my early life and then gave some insight into some of my daily struggle’s past and present. I then interviewed my parents to understand their own experience and feelings throughout my life growing up and the impact of my diagnosis on them. I then interviewed Lissette Lent, an American living in Arizona whose daughter Maggie, also has Trisomy 8, although not quite the same. The interview with Lissette was incredibly insightful as I could see many similarities between myself and Maggie and also my parents and Lissette’s perspective. I then concluded the documentary by giving a brief explanation about my own perspective and feelings and a message to my future self.

Lydia Law.

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