An experienced seamstress initially with a fashion design diploma from a young age, I am now a mum of 4,...

This costume shows the journey of Cinderella's ball gown. A transforming costume designed for a ballet production of Cinderella, the design is based on the Disney version of the story but set in the baroque era. The journey of this costume begins when Cinderella wears the dress that was initially her mothers but had been altered by her army of pet friends. She arrives at the stairs and surprises her stepmother and sisters that she is coming to the Ball, Only to be Attacked and have parts of her dress torn off by her stepsisters. She is wearing a pink Baroque style tutu with a headdress and sleeves. Velcro holds on the top layer of the skirt at the front, and both sleeves are separate from the bodice, with Velcro openings torn open when Cinderella is under attack. The top layer and sleeves are discarded, and Cinderella is left with a torn and ragged layer of the tutu (the bodice is still intact). Cinderella is then distraught and left to sob. When the fairy godmother appears and begins to change the torn dress into the ball gown, the stage lights go down momentarily. The torn layer is released by pulling open snap poppers at the side seam and then pulling quickly on a small hoop connected to a fishing wire holding the side seam together on the bodice. The pink bodice that is attached to the torn skirt is then discarded. As this is happening, twinkle lights are built into the tutu underneath, activated by the fairy godmother, which appears in the darkened stage. The lights create a magical glow, and within seconds, the stage lights are back on, revealing the change of dress into the ball gown. This costume shows careful consideration of proportions and placement of multiple layers, including the careful incorporation of electronics to the ball gown.

A costume designed for the character Chevalier Des Greix from the Opera "Manon". Inspiration was taken from high society men's tailoring of the mid-1800s. There are illusional elements to the costume, such as the waistcoat, sleeves, jabot and a secret pocket. The costume shows the development of tailoring skills and attention to detail through precise pattern matching

A costume designed for carnival/festival wear. The detailed design interprets a piece of artwork by an Italian artist called Hunto, whose work is full-on colour, his murals have a twisted take on cubism, and his work mainly represents people, faces, the beauty of the female form their energy. Hunto's pieces are an ongoing exploration of the intertwined themes of eroticism and human relationships. In addition, the costume represents the concept of communication through movement. The faces were redrawn and mapped out on a simple dress pattern and a batwing shape attached to one side of the dress. The dress & wing are made from a black four-way stretch scuba with a low back for easy access. The faces are appliqued on with multiple coloured fabric. When the arm is raised on the batwing shaped element, the second kissing couple's face is revealed, thus engaging communication.

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This costume shows the journey of Cinderella's ball gown. A transforming costume designed for a ballet production of Cinderella, the design is based on the Disney version of the story but set in the baroque era. The journey of this costume begins when Cinderella wears the dress that was initially her mothers but had been altered by her army of pet friends. She arrives at the stairs and surprises her stepmother and sisters that she is coming to the Ball, Only to be Attacked and have parts of her dress torn off by her stepsisters. She is wearing a pink Baroque style tutu with a headdress and sleeves. Velcro holds on the top layer of the skirt at the front, and both sleeves are separate from the bodice, with Velcro openings torn open when Cinderella is under attack. The top layer and sleeves are discarded, and Cinderella is left with a torn and ragged layer of the tutu (the bodice is still intact). Cinderella is then distraught and left to sob. When the fairy godmother appears and begins to change the torn dress into the ball gown, the stage lights go down momentarily. The torn layer is released by pulling open snap poppers at the side seam and then pulling quickly on a small hoop connected to a fishing wire holding the side seam together on the bodice. The pink bodice that is attached to the torn skirt is then discarded. As this is happening, twinkle lights are built into the tutu underneath, activated by the fairy godmother, which appears in the darkened stage. The lights create a magical glow, and within seconds, the stage lights are back on, revealing the change of dress into the ball gown. This costume shows careful consideration of proportions and placement of multiple layers, including the careful incorporation of electronics to the ball gown.

A costume designed for the character Chevalier Des Greix from the Opera "Manon". Inspiration was taken from high society men's tailoring of the mid-1800s. There are illusional elements to the costume, such as the waistcoat, sleeves, jabot and a secret pocket. The costume shows the development of tailoring skills and attention to detail through precise pattern matching

A costume designed for carnival/festival wear. The detailed design interprets a piece of artwork by an Italian artist called Hunto, whose work is full-on colour, his murals have a twisted take on cubism, and his work mainly represents people, faces, the beauty of the female form their energy. Hunto's pieces are an ongoing exploration of the intertwined themes of eroticism and human relationships. In addition, the costume represents the concept of communication through movement. The faces were redrawn and mapped out on a simple dress pattern and a batwing shape attached to one side of the dress. The dress & wing are made from a black four-way stretch scuba with a low back for easy access. The faces are appliqued on with multiple coloured fabric. When the arm is raised on the batwing shaped element, the second kissing couple's face is revealed, thus engaging communication.

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