Born and raised in the Netherlands I finished a degree in web development in 2014, but after a few years...

Designer: Maria Björnson. One of my ultimate dreams in the costume industry is to work for the West End in London. I therefore set myself the brief to make a West End quality costume, for which I chose to make a recreation of the Hannibal Slavegirl costume from the Phantom of the Opera, one of my all time favourite productions. Using research from the show’s cast members’ social media and information gained from the wardrobe team itself I recreated this costume to the best of my abilities. The costume consists of a green/red velvet boned bodice with matching embellishments, trims and beaded straps, green knickers and a detachable belt for potential quick changes during the performance.

I was eager to learn how to make a romantic tutu skirt, and was also intrigued to turn an animalistic character into a costume for a performer without working with puppets. Quickly settling on the Cheshire Cat as my chosen character I explored cat elements that I could use within costume making and ultimately created a recognisable yet classic ballet costume for the Cheshire Cat including a cat ear shaped bodice, and stripe and fur decorations inspired fur showcasing different colours, layers and texture. The blue and purple colours add a sense of mystery to the Cheshire Cat costume. This costume could be worn by one performer in the scene or can be recreated and worn by multiple performers to support the Cheshire Cat’s appearing and disappearing in the performance.

Being from the Netherlands myself I was intrigued to recreate a dress as seen on a Dutch painting, aiming for a literal reconstruction rather than conceptual. Shown is Mary Stuart, painted by Gerard van Honthorst in 1647. I was quickly drawn to the simplicity yet stunning colour of this dress. Using a combination of historical patterns and performance costume techniques I achieved a historically inspired costume that would allow future alterations for opera, where breathing and movement was considered. The costume includes a separate bodice, petticoat and pleated skirt. The bodice has large sleeves and beaded decorations to help recreate the original painting by Van Honthorst. (van Honthorst, G. (1647) Portrait Of Willem II (1626-1650), Prince Of Orange, And His Wife Mary Stuart (1631-1660). [Oil on canvas]. Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam)

Give this some love

19+

Designer: Maria Björnson. One of my ultimate dreams in the costume industry is to work for the West End in London. I therefore set myself the brief to make a West End quality costume, for which I chose to make a recreation of the Hannibal Slavegirl costume from the Phantom of the Opera, one of my all time favourite productions. Using research from the show’s cast members’ social media and information gained from the wardrobe team itself I recreated this costume to the best of my abilities. The costume consists of a green/red velvet boned bodice with matching embellishments, trims and beaded straps, green knickers and a detachable belt for potential quick changes during the performance.

I was eager to learn how to make a romantic tutu skirt, and was also intrigued to turn an animalistic character into a costume for a performer without working with puppets. Quickly settling on the Cheshire Cat as my chosen character I explored cat elements that I could use within costume making and ultimately created a recognisable yet classic ballet costume for the Cheshire Cat including a cat ear shaped bodice, and stripe and fur decorations inspired fur showcasing different colours, layers and texture. The blue and purple colours add a sense of mystery to the Cheshire Cat costume. This costume could be worn by one performer in the scene or can be recreated and worn by multiple performers to support the Cheshire Cat’s appearing and disappearing in the performance.

Being from the Netherlands myself I was intrigued to recreate a dress as seen on a Dutch painting, aiming for a literal reconstruction rather than conceptual. Shown is Mary Stuart, painted by Gerard van Honthorst in 1647. I was quickly drawn to the simplicity yet stunning colour of this dress. Using a combination of historical patterns and performance costume techniques I achieved a historically inspired costume that would allow future alterations for opera, where breathing and movement was considered. The costume includes a separate bodice, petticoat and pleated skirt. The bodice has large sleeves and beaded decorations to help recreate the original painting by Van Honthorst. (van Honthorst, G. (1647) Portrait Of Willem II (1626-1650), Prince Of Orange, And His Wife Mary Stuart (1631-1660). [Oil on canvas]. Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam)

Give this some love

19+
Dani Labruyère Dani Labruyère Dani Labruyère Dani Labruyère Dani Labruyère Dani Labruyère Dani Labruyère Dani Labruyère Dani Labruyère Dani Labruyère Dani Labruyère Dani Labruyère Dani Labruyère Dani Labruyère Dani Labruyère Dani Labruyère Dani Labruyère Dani Labruyère Dani Labruyère Dani Labruyère Dani Labruyère Dani Labruyère Dani Labruyère Dani Labruyère Dani Labruyère Dani Labruyère Dani Labruyère