This costume degree has been an amazing journey. I have enjoyed challenging myself to create strong, dramatic costumes utilising a...

Theatre ‘A School for Scandal’ – Lady Sneerwell. This theatre costume was created using the two Janet Arnold Patterns of Fashion ‘Snowshill’ dresses as the base for the design of this 18th Century Robe a l’Anglaise. The colours of green, for envy, and wine-red, for anger and self-importance, reflect this character who, via a group of confidants, sets out to besmirch the reputations of acquaintances in their circle for their own amusement. Using a dress from the Royal Opera House store as research I was able to consider the performance requirements as well as historical accuracy and completed the ensemble with appropriate underpinnings, shoes, choker and hat with detailed embellishments and hand beading.

Opera ‘Manon Lescaut’ – Renato Des Grieux. I chose the Opera ‘Manon Lescaut’ and the character ‘Renato Des Grieux’ for our Royal Opera House challenge project. Detailed research on the story of ‘Manon’ led me specifically to 1721 for a male costume that reflects the character of the young student who is poor but from a good family. Using information from Norah Waugh’s book for the patterns and construction detail, augmented by asking questions of a re-enactment group of costume makers online, allowed me to create a costume suitable for the stage which reflects the timeline well.

Klimt’s Hygeia re-imagined as The Sea Witch in The Little Mermaid. Klimt’s ‘shaman-like’ character of Hygeia, inspired my choice of ballet costume for the Sea Witch in a version of the Little Mermaid which ends in tragedy. The combined elements of a static performance in the first act and then a gymnastic dance sequence in the second act was the major challenge in designing a costume which could be used in both, with the cape adding colour and drama in her undersea lair, then the unitard allowing her to move freely on-land. Using chiffon and organza, stretch, pleather, painting and beading on lycra, dyeing, embroidery and millinery have enabled me to showcase both my versatility and attention to detail in a truly dramatic costume.

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Theatre ‘A School for Scandal’ – Lady Sneerwell. This theatre costume was created using the two Janet Arnold Patterns of Fashion ‘Snowshill’ dresses as the base for the design of this 18th Century Robe a l’Anglaise. The colours of green, for envy, and wine-red, for anger and self-importance, reflect this character who, via a group of confidants, sets out to besmirch the reputations of acquaintances in their circle for their own amusement. Using a dress from the Royal Opera House store as research I was able to consider the performance requirements as well as historical accuracy and completed the ensemble with appropriate underpinnings, shoes, choker and hat with detailed embellishments and hand beading.

Opera ‘Manon Lescaut’ – Renato Des Grieux. I chose the Opera ‘Manon Lescaut’ and the character ‘Renato Des Grieux’ for our Royal Opera House challenge project. Detailed research on the story of ‘Manon’ led me specifically to 1721 for a male costume that reflects the character of the young student who is poor but from a good family. Using information from Norah Waugh’s book for the patterns and construction detail, augmented by asking questions of a re-enactment group of costume makers online, allowed me to create a costume suitable for the stage which reflects the timeline well.

Klimt’s Hygeia re-imagined as The Sea Witch in The Little Mermaid. Klimt’s ‘shaman-like’ character of Hygeia, inspired my choice of ballet costume for the Sea Witch in a version of the Little Mermaid which ends in tragedy. The combined elements of a static performance in the first act and then a gymnastic dance sequence in the second act was the major challenge in designing a costume which could be used in both, with the cape adding colour and drama in her undersea lair, then the unitard allowing her to move freely on-land. Using chiffon and organza, stretch, pleather, painting and beading on lycra, dyeing, embroidery and millinery have enabled me to showcase both my versatility and attention to detail in a truly dramatic costume.

Give this some love

Beverley Hulme Beverley Hulme Beverley Hulme Beverley Hulme Beverley Hulme Beverley Hulme Beverley Hulme Beverley Hulme Beverley Hulme Beverley Hulme Beverley Hulme Beverley Hulme Beverley Hulme Beverley Hulme Beverley Hulme Beverley Hulme Beverley Hulme Beverley Hulme Beverley Hulme Beverley Hulme Beverley Hulme Beverley Hulme Beverley Hulme Beverley Hulme Beverley Hulme Beverley Hulme Beverley Hulme Beverley Hulme Beverley Hulme