I have always been creative and I am driven by the idea of taking an empty space or room and...

I chose the London Buddhist Centre located on 51 Roman Road in Bethnal Green to redevelop into a house of multiple occupancy for young professionals. The building was built in a Neo Baroque style in 1888 as a grand fire station and was given Grade II listed status in 1973. Having ceased use as a fire station in 1968 it became the London Buddhist Centre in 1978.
The design comprises of a communal recreational area on the ground floor, with a café, co-working and work pod areas. The floors above contain flats for the young professionals, consisting of seven studio flats on the 1st floor, four larger studio apartments on the 2nd floor and three luxury one bed apartments on the top floor.

The main aim of this project was to create an affordable space for young professionals to live, work, socialise and unwind, whilst making the most of the buildings location in an up and coming area of London. Due to the pandemic many people have been working from home alone, this project was the perfect way to allow people to socialise while working from home. My target market are young millennials and gen z who are very socially and ethically aware, so I incorporated sustainability throughout my design.

I focused on the design of the ground floor. I took inspiration from the history of the building as a fire station, also the mindfulness and tranquillity of the previous use as the London Buddhist Centre. From this I explored the different elements Earth, Water, Wind and Fire and this was my concept for each of the spaces.

The atrium was inspired by water. Designed as a break out zone from the work areas this is a free flowing and calm space. I researched well-being and created a colour scheme to compliment, incorporating a water feature into the space.

The café was influenced by the building’s use as a Fire Station. Using red as the main colour scheme links to the fire and is also a stimulating colour. Using dark, earthy red tones merges fire with earth one of the other elements that the design is influenced by. Ebonised wood is a sustainable material used for the flooring;, resembling charred wood it makes a striking contrast to the red. A bespoke pendant light for the café was inspired by the brass fire pole which I gave a modern twist, by having the brass curve around the light tube. The bespoke tables were inspired by molten lava.

The co-working space is inspired by the earth element. I chose a neutral colour scheme with an accent colour of sage green, to create a calming effect. Living walls encourage a healthy mind and body as well as adding a focus to the room. Soundproofing was added by using Bubblesorba acoustic panels on the wall, to reduce noise pollution and create an interesting feature. The pod room is also inspired by the earth element and uses the same colour palette, encapsulating the same well-being qualities.

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I chose the London Buddhist Centre located on 51 Roman Road in Bethnal Green to redevelop into a house of multiple occupancy for young professionals. The building was built in a Neo Baroque style in 1888 as a grand fire station and was given Grade II listed status in 1973. Having ceased use as a fire station in 1968 it became the London Buddhist Centre in 1978.
The design comprises of a communal recreational area on the ground floor, with a café, co-working and work pod areas. The floors above contain flats for the young professionals, consisting of seven studio flats on the 1st floor, four larger studio apartments on the 2nd floor and three luxury one bed apartments on the top floor.

The main aim of this project was to create an affordable space for young professionals to live, work, socialise and unwind, whilst making the most of the buildings location in an up and coming area of London. Due to the pandemic many people have been working from home alone, this project was the perfect way to allow people to socialise while working from home. My target market are young millennials and gen z who are very socially and ethically aware, so I incorporated sustainability throughout my design.

I focused on the design of the ground floor. I took inspiration from the history of the building as a fire station, also the mindfulness and tranquillity of the previous use as the London Buddhist Centre. From this I explored the different elements Earth, Water, Wind and Fire and this was my concept for each of the spaces.

The atrium was inspired by water. Designed as a break out zone from the work areas this is a free flowing and calm space. I researched well-being and created a colour scheme to compliment, incorporating a water feature into the space.

The café was influenced by the building’s use as a Fire Station. Using red as the main colour scheme links to the fire and is also a stimulating colour. Using dark, earthy red tones merges fire with earth one of the other elements that the design is influenced by. Ebonised wood is a sustainable material used for the flooring;, resembling charred wood it makes a striking contrast to the red. A bespoke pendant light for the café was inspired by the brass fire pole which I gave a modern twist, by having the brass curve around the light tube. The bespoke tables were inspired by molten lava.

The co-working space is inspired by the earth element. I chose a neutral colour scheme with an accent colour of sage green, to create a calming effect. Living walls encourage a healthy mind and body as well as adding a focus to the room. Soundproofing was added by using Bubblesorba acoustic panels on the wall, to reduce noise pollution and create an interesting feature. The pod room is also inspired by the earth element and uses the same colour palette, encapsulating the same well-being qualities.

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